Film: 8843

Adverts | 1950 | Sound | B/W

Clip:

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Synopsis:

Selection of American TV adverts from the late 1950's to the 1960's -

includes 'Prestone' spray de-icer, Allstate insurance, Pall Mall cigarettes, Beechnut chewing-gum, various cereals, venus Paradise Colouring sets, Camel cigarettes, Polaroid Land Cameras, The Chemstrand Coroporation products, Skippy peanut butter, Armour Star frankfurters, Utica Club beer, Buxton wallets, TV guide and a couple of boating safety adverts.

American policeman, dressed for very cold weather, wearing his policeman's cap with a dusting of snow on the peak, and a cape that seems to start from above his ears, it's draped around his head and under his chin like a nun's habit, and he has a very stern look on his face. The background is a backdrop - four storey buildings on a street corner, with American-style traffic lights (with lights on red) visible, with snow on them. In close up The policeman raises his white-gloved hand, with palm facing the camera, as though he is signalling for the traffic to stop. The voiceover warns motorists not to be 'frost blind' in the winter. Then the solution appears - a can of 'Prestone' spray de-icer, which floats mysteriously in the frame, spraying out its contents into the air, the words 'Prestone Spray De-Icer' appear next to the can.
In the next shot, lady dressed warmly in a coat with a fur collar and a black hat sprays the windscreen of a large car, the effect of which clears the the 'ice' which has been obscuring the two young children who are reading comics animatedly in the front of the car, the little boy sitting almost in the driving seat, both dressed in winter clothes, the little girl with her hood up, the boy wearing a cap and ear muffs. They are happy & smiling as they both move over to allow the woman to enter the car, she closes the door and settles in the driver's seat, reaching for the ignition.
Next, sequence of images showing various uses of the product - a gloved hand sprays de-icer onto the rear window of a car, then sprays into the lock of a car door handle, then under a tyre (all close-up views)
Next the gloved hand opens the glove compartment of a car to reveal a can of 'Prestone' inside, takes it out, and closes the door. Back to the image of the hovering can of 'Prestone', this time accompanied by the words, in large letters, 'See to go', followed by '"Prestone" spray de-icer', then finally just the words 'A Union Carbide product' on the screen, with 'Union Carbide' written in its logo form.
Ends.

Animation, 50's style, shows a suburban street corner, with a wide grass verge, and a tree next to a garage. The garage door lifts to reveal the high tailfins of a very 50's looking car, the car shakes as it starts up, the garage door closes, and the car reverses out, smashing through the wooden door and stopping on the drive. The oversized driver is wearing a hat and a suit and looks rather annoyed as the tailfins of his car are all mangled up.
Suddenly he looks shocked, raises his hands to his face, and leaps out of the car and runs offscreen.
A single storey modern looking small house - the man runs up and blocks the way to the front door with an agonised look on his face. The four leaflets appear, covering this image, each with a single word on the front, relating to insurance policies - 'Home'; 'Contents'; 'Theft'; 'Liability', the man's face peers worriedly from between them. The leaflets disappear and the front door suddenly opens, slamming the man against the wall, behind the door as a masked man in a stripey top carrying his bag of 'swag' rushes out. A policeman chases him from the house, waving his truncheon and blowing on his whistle as he leaps animatedly into the air. He is followed by a barking dog, music accompanies this 'comical' scene. The front closes revealing the man who slides off the wall and goes to sit down, exhausted-looking and anxious, on the grass in his garden.
The voiceover warns of the possible mishaps that could give rise to a need for insurance such as one's dog biting a policeman, as the dog returns to the harried-looking owner carrying a star emblazoned piece of ripped cloth, obviously torn from the policeman's uniform. Suddenly a waft of smoke passes in front of them and they both turn to face us, wide-eyed and anxious. Cut to the little house, completely engulfed in the blazing flames of a fire. The man rushes into shot with a hosepipe, but it's too late, as the house suddenly transforms into a charred timber frame with a few blackened pieces of furniture inside. The frame crumbles down to dust, followed by the furniture, leaving only a brick chimney breast and fireplace standing, and a TV aerial. As the voiceover says 'We don't say that these things WILL happen…' the scene plays backwards, the house reappears, dog runs out etc, with the man still standing in the foreground holding the hose with a shocked look on his face. As the burglar runs backwards into the house the man, relieved, drops the hose and runs off, back to the garage, jumps into his still-damaged car, reverses into the street, and drives off along a suburban street (we move alongside him). He stops by a building that has a sign saying 'ALLSTATE' above it, jumps out of the car and enters the building, then a 'Sears' store appears, where you can also buy 'Allstate' insurance policies, then a telephone showing you can simply call to arrange a policy with Allstate. Final image is presumably their logo, showing a pair of drawn hands which cradle a little house and a car - 'Allstate Insurance Companies' appears written above the hands and the (male) voiceover states 'You're in good hands with Allstate'.
Ends.

Close up of a clean-shaven man with a cigarette in his mouth which he lights with an expensive-looking lighter. He is wearing a dark suit-jacket, white shirt and tie. Then we see his whole face as he draws on the cigarette and exhales, he gazes somewhere beyond the camera, transported by the pleasure of the smoke. Then there is a packet of Pall Mall cigarettes artfully displayed with a few cigarettes sticking up out of the packet on a flat surface, also an ashtray on which a male hand perches the still-lit cigarette. The voiceover describes Pall Mall cigarettes as 'Good, good, good', as the words 'Good! Good! Good!' appear on the frame next to the cigarette packet.
Then a close-up of the cigarette packet as a woman's fingertips, with long, unpainted but immaculately manicured nails, reach down to pull a cigarette out of the packet. Then we see the woman's face in a head and shoulders shot, as the man's hand enters the shot to light her cigarette from the same lighter. The woman is young and very attractive, with short blonde hair coiffured and backcombed, she wears make-up and elegant earrings. A well-dressed man in a suit walks in front of this scene, as though walking in front of a giant advertising hoarding that has come to life, he looks up at the moving image and turns to the camera and we see that he is the man who is doing the voiceover. The woman inhales and exhales the smoke as the camera pulls back and we see her companion, the man from the first scene of the advert. They chat happily together, then there is another close-up of the woman inhaling from the cigarette, followed by the man exhaling while the narrator, still visible in front of the giant faces on the screen says that Pall Mall cigarettes have 'satisfying flavour that is friendly to your taste' and are 'never too strong, never too weak'. The couple laugh and the woman gently leans her head to touch the mans.
Then a short animated piece titled 'Smoke traveled thru fine tobacco tastes best' shows first a packet of Pall Mall over a leaf of a tobacco plant, then a lit cigarette in front of the leaf. The image turns into an 'X-ray' view of the cigarette, showing the tightly-packed tobacco inside, with the smoke flowing through it as though someone has inhaled on the cigarette. There is a close up of this image, as the voiceover explains how this process of inhaled smoke passing through 'fine tobacco' results in a milder smoke. 'Yes', says the voiceover, 'the smoke is travelled over, under, around and through Pall Mall's traditionally fine, mellow tobaccos'. Cut to scene of narrator in front of the blank screen on which appears the words 'Good!, good!, good!', followed a continuation of the cigarettes and ashtray on the table set, the man's hand picks up the cigarette from the ashtray and again we see him inhale and exhale. The final shot show the ashtray with a smoking cigarette on the left, then another added on the right, with text underneath that states 'You can light either end!' and 'Outstanding, and they are mild!'
Ends.

A man's legs - he is wearing jeans, and pointed boots, and sporting a handgun in a holster, he walks past a wooden porch of a house similar to the type seen in Western movies. This image is shot through the spokes of a wooden wagon wheel. He slowly and slightly menacingly approaches the camera, we can clearly see the tooled leather of his gunholster, and his hand hovering over the gun. The voiceover says 'reach', and the man's hand reaches for the gun, then slips behind the holster and pulls out a pack of 'Beech nut peppermint' chewing gum. He hands the packet to someone offscreen whose hand reaches into view, actors voices offering gum, and receiving - 'Thank-you pardner, don't mind if ah do'.
Close-up view of the packet of gum, held in a male hand, whilst the voiceover extols its virtues - 'The gum that sparkles your smile' and 'a combination of two delicious mints - aromamint and flavourmint' - whatever they might be! Then a short animation showing leaves with text - a very fifties style font - saying 'aroma-mint' and 'flavor-mint' floating past.
Cut to a couple in an outdoor-styled set complete with cut-out cactus and a real plant with long spikey leaves. The man wears a checked shirt (lumberjack style) and the woman, who has dark shoulder-length hair cut in a bob, sports a thick ribbed sweater and a scarf that blows in the 'breeze'. The man takes the gum out of his shirt pocket and offers the woman a stick of gum, she takes it as she laughs and smiles, whilst the voiceover tells us how the gum freshens the breath. The last shot shows a close-up of the packet of gum next to the gun in its holster.
Ends.

Script on screen begins this advert - 'Bob Le Mond speaking for Philips' Milk of Magnesia' - fades to a man, presumably Mr Le Mond, who is wearing a suit and sitting on a desk in an office, he is holds a clipboard and looks officious. Le Mond explains how the people at Philips asked doctors all over the U.S.A. if they recommended 'milk of magnesia' to their patients. He walks over to a map of the Northern States of America which is on the wall, and has tiny lights all over it, presumably representing the locations of the doctors who took part in the survey. The bulbs light up as the Mr Le Mond speaks, and flash when he states that 'Yes, doctors do recommend Milk of Magnesia'. Image of a bottle of Milk of Magnesia, text appears on the screen of the types of medical specialist who recommend it: obstetricians, paediatricians, general practicioners and surgeons. Back to head and shoulders shot of Bob who says that the product is not just a laxative, but also an antacid - this is illustrated by a simple animation which shows two bottles with 'laxative' and 'antacid' written on them, which then join together to make one bottle which then transforms into the Milk of Magnesia bottle accompanied by the text 'More complete relief'.
Bob then stands in front of a flipchart which has the names of the types of specialists mentioned above printed on it, then we jump to a shot of two Milk of Magnesia bottles, one mint-flavoured, the other 'regular'.
Ends.

Someone skis out in the open countryside (off piste) on thick snow covered ground near a pine forest. Closer view of skier. Voiceover warns of the dangers that can face a skier such as a fall or worse still, an avalanche - this accompanied by footage of an avalanche which looks like it was made in a studio. The skier whizzes past the camera. View of beautiful snow-covered valley, with pine trees dotted around. Skier comes into view, and jumps on the loose snow in order to cause a mini avalanche, in the hopes of preventing small avalanches growing into big ones. Shot of man in anorak and peaked cap, standing by a low white fence, he has his hands in his pockets, and one foot resting on the edge of the fence, looking rather imposing, and at one with his surroundings. Text on the frame says: 'Rod Triplett: Squaw Valley Ski Patrol'. He takes his hands out of his pockets and lights a cigarette as we see a close-up of the packet, with the name 'Camel' clearly visible, clasped in his hand. Mr Triplett inhales and sits smoking, with big white clouds in the sky behind him. Then we see a close-up of his weathered, tanned face as he exhales with a macho smirk. Man in suit in a studio speaks - he is the narrator of the advert - 'doesn't that sound like the cigarette you should be smoking', text then appears on the screen - 'Smoking more…Enjoying it less?, the narrator then pulls out his own camel cigarette, takes a long draw on it, exhales and 'the best tobacco makes the best smoke' text appears on the screen as he says those words. Final shot is a close-up of a hand holding a packet of Camels, with the drawing of a camel clearly visible accompanied by the text and voiceover - 'have a real cigarette, have a Camel'
Ends.

A photographic image of a packet of 'Armour' frankfurter sausages in front of a drawing of a city - skyscrapers dramatically backlit by giant searchlights, whose beams search the sky as the photo changes into an animated picture of a hotdog on a toasting fork, above a row of flames. The voiceover talks about the special 'open fire flavour, right in the meat itself', as the image changes back to the packet of 'franks'.
Animation - on a background of bark-effect surface is the title (drop-shadow effect), 'Open - fire theatre', written in Wild-West style lettering, with an animated flame with a three-cornered hat with a star on the front, who flicks flames from his fingertips. The show begins with what looks like a real bird on a branch, in a tree. Camera zooms in on 'Betty Bird', her beak has been animated to move as though talking to the audience - in a 'Porky Pig' style voice she espouses the qualities of Armour Star Franks. Animation ends.
A fire made from sticks and branches is burning, frankfurters on the end of sticks are being held over the fire by unseen hands, then the sausages are shown boiling in a pan of water on a stovetop, the little animated flame jumps onto the edge of the pan, then there is a close-up of a sausage in the pan & the flame jumps down into the water and swims through the sausage, to demonstrate how the 'open fire' flavour resides within the sausage. Cut to a close-up of a frankfurter on a fork, a young boy comes into shot and takes a bite out of it. The animated flame shoots across the screen over the frankfurter, the words 'sizzly juicy' trail behind him and remain on top of the sausage to emphasize its qualities, this sequence is repeated several times to get the message across. When the shots change in this 'Open Fire Theatre' sequence, a star opens up the next scene - which matches the one on the animated flame's hat and the star on the packet of frankfurters. Next shot shows a packet of sausages and the 'flame' who flicks little animated flames at the packet. Back to shot of the bird with the animated beak who again reminds us how good the frankfurters are. Then there's a repeat of the shot with the sausages being held in the fire on twigs, followed by a final endorsement by the 'flame' next to the packet of 'Armour Star Franks'.
Ends.

Animation. Meteorite flies towards us and bursts open revealing packet of cereal called 'Trix'. The packet tips up and pours out cereal, the different shades of grey suggesting many different colours, the packet disappears out of shot as the cascade of cereal gets bigger (just looks like small round nuggets)
Change of scene to a hedge with just the top of a Davy Crockett style hat showing above as the wearer of the hat runs along and then appears from behind the hedge in a playground setting - there is a slide in the background, and a climbing frame which the little boys jumps onto. He is wearing a full Davy Crockett outfit, and carrying a toy rifle. He jumps around on the frame, hanging upside down and aiming his gun. He jumps off the frame and walks across the top of a see-saw, sits on one of the seats, and bounces a couple of times. Close-up as he smiles and rubs his stomache in anticipation of his breakfast. The image whirls round and changes into the image of an alarm clock with the hands whirling round the dial, backwards, as the voiceover says 'lets turn back the clock to see how a rainbow of colour filled his cereal dish'. A free-floating packet of 'Trix' cereal pours its contents into a bowl that sits on a tablecloth with a uniform pattern of crosses in boxes on it. The contents of the bowl glow brightly as the narrator reels off the colours of the cereal - red, yellow, orange - 'happy colours', a jug of milk appears and pours onto the cereal in the bowl. Close up of the glowing bowl of cereal which sparkles like gems as the narrator says that no sugar is necessary because Trix is as 'tempting as candy, tasty as fruit, nourishing too'. Next we see the little boy (still wearing the Davy Crockett hat!) waking in his bed with a start as the sun pops up into view through his window. There are toys around the bed - a train, a American football style football, a baseball bat and ball and a couple of model aeroplanes hanging on strings - all emphasizing the idea that the boy is sporty and energetic, due to his diet of 'Trix' cereal. The sun smiles at the boy, and he smiles back, leaping from beneath the covers and bouncing up and down. The narrator sings 'Happy breakfast to you' to the tune of the traditional Happy Birthday song through to the finish of the advert, as the boy leaps into the bathroom and stands on a stool in front of a washbasin, and rubs his face with a flannel before leaping off, discarding his trousers as he jumps backwards. Fully dressed, he arrives at the breakfast table with the bowl of cereal on it and begins to spoon it into his mouth.The little boy jumps onto the see-saw, drops his gun, picks up a packet of 'Trix' and starts eating it out of the packet, then holds up the packet, smiling happily.
Ends.

The outline of a picture appears on the screen - a cowboy on horseback brandishing a lassoo above his head, as the camera draws back to reveal more of the picture, a pencil colours in the blank areas of the image, in a speeded-up motion. The cowboys is using the lassoo to catch a steer from a group. When the colouring-in is complete, a wooden frame appears around the edge of the picture. The image within the frame changes to one of the Statue of Liberty, then the Capitol, as the narrator says that using the Venus Paradise colouring set you can make pictures that 'look like the work of a real artist'. The actual product then appears - a box with the words 'Venus Paradise' on the front, and small images of the kind of results you might expect to achieve. Two stars on the front of the box pop into the forground so that you can read about the qualities of the product - one says: 'No water, no brush, no mess', the narrator says you simply use 'Paradise' coloured pencils, and the full set appear on the screen. The camera pulls back to show the images that come with the set, and the pencils set in their 'easel rack', and 'even a pencil sharpener' (image of child's pair of hands sharpening a pencil above a colour-by-numbers picture) The hand, holding a pencil, starts to colour in the image, the idea being that the numbered areas correspond to the numbers written on the pencils. Then there is another speeded-up colouring in, this time of an old-fashioned ship in full sail, with seagulls flying about. Then the image is seen framed on the wall, the camera pulls back and the backs of a small boy and a teenage girl's heads are visible, as they admire the picture. They both have blonde hair, and the girl sports two plaits. Then all the different painting sets available are shown, with the varying prices, in dollars - ranging from one dollar to five, marked up above them. Last shot as the narrator reminds us to get our Venus Paradise Colouring Sets today shows the brand-name of the product over an image of the statue of Venus de Milo.
Ends.

Shot of hand-held Polaroid 'Land' camera, with enormous flash bulb and housing attached, the words 'Polaroid Land Camera' across the bottom of the screen. The flash goes off (animation), the camera turns around, and a flap on the back opens up to reveal a photo of a little boy (head & shoulders shot), the caption 'Great new film' writes over the previous one, and the photo moves towards us for a clearer view of it. The film is mute for these scenes, and there is a black screen for a couple of seconds before the next shot, which is of a couple on a stage, the man wears a raincoat and goggles pushed up onto his head, the woman, who has short blonde 50's style coiffured hair, wears a white dress. The audience is clapping, as a man (the presenter) holding a Polaroid Land Camera moves into position in order to take their photo. He is wearing a suit and a bow tie and he and the couple seem to be minor celebrities - perhaps comic actors as they make jokes and seem to be 'in character'. The presenter explains how the film takes sixty seconds to develop in the camera, then the couple leave the stage to loud applause, and the curtain closes behind the presenter, leaving him alone on stage, facing the camera. He explains how the camera works makes the point that he used it for the first time only ten minutes previously, implying its ease of use. He also mentions the couple's names: Shirley and Terry, and goes on for a while about how much fun it is taking pictures with the Polaroid - 'candid shots of the children, close-ups of guests' and 'pictures you never would've bothered taking with an ordinary camera'. He takes photo out of his pocket and holds it for a close-up, it is of his two children and their dog, he comments on how sharp the image is. He checks his watch, and opens the back of the camera and peels off the photo of Shirley and Terry and the camera zooms in for a close-up, the audience applauds. The presenter then lists the possible events that you might be able to photograph if you bought a Polaroid Land Camera, and says 'Why don't you get one next week and not miss any of the pictures you wanna take'. Back to shot of camera, which has a large bellows, and is enormous, for a hand-held camera, whilst the narrator explains the payment schemes available for buying the camera.
Ends.

Shot of decorative old-fashioned style street sign - 'Wall st.', buildings just visible in the background. Cut to a male lion walking along the pavement towards the camera on (Wall?) street, with cars and office blocks visible in background. Side view of the lion walking out across the pavement as though waiting to cross the road - a traffic light in the background is on green. When it changes to red, the lion crosses the road. Next shot, the lion is walking into a poster that has the wording: 'Dreyfus Fund Inc.' - the lion appears to walk across the top of the lettering. He pauses, and morphs into a drawing of a lion, as the camera pulls back to reveal the company's address under its name (the company does mutual investment funds)
Ends.

Woodland scene, close-up on wicker picnic-style basket - the lid opens and out pops a beer stein, or ceramic beer tankard which is white, with a flip-up lid which has a face on it. The effect of speech is given by lifting the lids of the tankards so they seem like mouths talking. The first tankard which has a picture of a shamrock on the side, wakes the second, which has a patterned design and a large handlebar moustache drawn on - both of them have Irish accents. Hands move in and grasp the handles of the jugs to lift them out of the basket and onto a checked picnic cloth on the ground - the first tankard says to the unseen person 'put me down gently, lady, its been a long hard drive'. They both lift their lids (ie open their mouths) and a man's hand pours in a can of beer as they both sigh with relief, and the moustachioed jug says 'its good to get back to natural beer' 'without artificial bubbles'. The hands reach in and pick up the jugs in unison. A black and white kitten walks towards the picnic basket, which has a pile of chunky-looking homemade sandwiches wrapped in clear plastic bags next to it. The kitten sniffs the sandwiches, then carries on to the patterned tankard and begins to lick the side of it, as the tankard laughs as though being tickled, and the shanrock jug laughs at the scene. The kitten continues to lick the tankard all over his 'face' as he says 'doesn't that lady see what's happening here!', then cut to a large bucket full of cans of beer nestled in ice-cubes. The camera zooms in to the cans for a clearer view, then cut to a close-up of a can bearing the name: 'Utica Club' 'Pilsener lager beer' 'XX Dry'.
Ends.

Night-time shot flying over huge factory complex, with tall chimneys belching smoke, a gas tower and clusters of lights on buildings - the caption 'The Chemstrand Corporation' appears as the narrator says 'producers of fibre that nature never dreamed of' this title comes towards the camera until it disappears. It is followed by other captions that move in the same way - 'Acrilan - acrylic fiber' and 'Chemstrand nylon', the music is dramatic with a roll of drums to emphasize the importance of these modern man-made fibres. Then a shot of a little boy, a little girl and a Bassett Hound, all sitting on stools. The camera moves in to a close-up on each of their faces, the children pull faces to show that they are 'bad', as they are being accused of murder - by crushing, drowning and burying alive. Next we go to the 'scene of the crime', the children are on the floor (which is covered by a pale-coloured carpet) in a living room with 1950's style furniture, the little boy has roller skates on, the girl, who has dark hair in two plaits, is reading a comic whilst sucking on a straw from a bottle of pop. A close-up of the carpet shows us the 'intended victim' (the carpet!), the carpet is made of 'acrilan' and the 'murderers' just couldn't kill it'. Back to the children, the boy stands up and starts to roll along on on his skates - followed by a close-up of a roller-skate wheel going over carpet fibres, which spring back resiliently as explained by the narrator and a caption over the image: 'Acrilan springs back'. Back to the little girl who accidentally knocks over her bottle of what looks like coke leaving a dark stain on the carpet. Close-up of a hand with a cloth wiping away the stain, which completely disappears. The dog walks over the carpet, leaving black paw prints, followed by a close up of a hand with a small brush dusting the carpet, with a pair of elegant-looking feet in court shoes visible - the suggestion being that you don't really have to do any housework with this miraculous carpet, and can look elegant all the time. Then we see the owner of the hand and feet, a woman sitting quite comfortably in a chair, leaning down and gently dusting the carpet with the little brush - she is dressed smartly in a short-sleeved top and skirt. The children are sitting with her, and the little boy strokes the dog. The woman speaks to the camera as it draws away from her, and a caption simply states 'Acrilan'.
Ends.

Shot from the back seat of a car driving along a highway, cars are visible at the side of the road, there is the wail of a siren and an ambulance cuts across in front of the car. We can see the backs of a man who is driving and a little boy wearing a stripey top in the passenger seat. The voiceover is dramatic - 'you never know when it's going to happen', 'suddenly tragedy touches your life'. The boy starts 'rubbernecking' out of the window, and we see out to a car which is upside down, people are rushing towards it, and stand around it, trying to look to see who is trapped inside - the narrator intones 'man, woman, baby'. The boy looks out to see a police car parked by the side of the road, the camera turns to the back seat of the car where a woman sits with a little girl, looking concerned, as they both ogle at the accident scene. The girl turns towards the woman looking upset, the mother strokes her cheek reassuringly. Cut to man driving, his face full of concern for his own family (furrowed brow, set lips), he looks to the side, then back onto the road again. Shot of car driving along the highway - big 1950's design with prominent tailfins and whitewall tyres. Close-up of the tyres as they roll along, absorbing bumps, and splashing through puddles. Then car driving along the road again, the narrator says 'You're safer with nylon' and a caption 'Chemstrand Nylon' appears onscreen.
Ends.

View down the ramp of a bowling alley, a bowling ball rolls into shot and scores a strike, knocking over all the skittles. The insignia 'AMF' can be seen on the wall above the skittles. The set of skittles are automatically replaced. The two decorative tankards of the previous advert for Utica Club beer appear at the start of the ramp, the skittles visible in the background. They comment on the automatic 'pinboys' in their Irish accents, the moustachioed one complains that 'everything is automatic these days'. A microphone appears above them and a voice says 'order please'. Close-up of the smaller tankard who says (the lid of the tankard moves to give the impression of a mouth speaking) 'an automatic waitress - I wish my father could've lived to see this'. Close up of the other tankard who gruffly orders two Utica Club beers, 'and make it snappy'. A metal arm creaks into view, carrying the bottle of beer which it awkwardly tips towards the top of the tankard - most of it misses the 'mouth' of the container, cut to the smaller tankard, who rolls his 'eyes'. Back to the first tankard, whose complaining voice is being stifled by the beer pouring in. Close-up of the smaller one who observes that 'at least it's good old Utica Club - still made by a brewmaster, not by a chemist'. Then both of the tankards are in shot, and the mechanical arm appears above them, then a real hand, obviously a man's, reaches in and grabs the handle of the smaller jug, taking it out of shot. Close-up of the bottle of beer, then even closer to show the label on the bottle which says 'Utica Club XX dry Pilsener Lager Beer'.
Ends.

Animation - searching torchlight beam, plain dark grey background, then the beam suddenly illuminates a door which has 'Ace Jewelry Co.' written on it. A man appears, looks round suspiciously, and rummages in his pocket. He wears a flat cap and blazer style jacket. Eventually he pulls out a bunch of keys on a large keyring, then looks at them quizzically and tries to find the right key. An American policeman carrying a handgun which he points at the man (a burglar?) comes and taps him on the shoulder. The man turns toward him as he reaches up as though to pull down a blind, but he pulls down the bars of a prison cell as the door disappears, so that the burglar is trapped behind them. The cop then pulls from his inside pocket a leather wallet-shaped keyholder and smiles broadly as he selects a large key with which he locks the prison cell door, as the burglar holds the bars and peeps through with a look of distress on his face. The policeman, still smiling, puts the 'Buxton Keytainer' into his trouser pocket. He walks away and the 'keytainer' drops out of the pocket, only to be picked up by the burglar from behind his bars. He quickly finds the correct key, and reaches round to open his cell door, and runs from his 'jail', to a mailbox into which he drops the key fob and runs away, looking back as he does so. Then a postman takes the fob and walks towards where the cop is restraining the burglar - holding his collar - he hands the keys to the officer who takes them in his spare hand. Then the postman passes over a box wrapped like a gift with ribbon to the burglar, as whoever returns a lost 'Buxton keytainer' will receive a reward. Shot of a close-up of the product with the company logo 'Buxton' 'key-tainers', this one is the 'contour model' we are informed by a voiceover, it unzips to show the keys inside, then is joined by a 'billfold' wallet. Cut to the 'burglar' standing next to the prison cell 'bars', who holds up a wallet, and says 'What a great gift idea for the mob'.
Ends.

Inside a bar or public house, a jukebox stands against the wall at the end of a wooden bar, the two Utica Club beer tankards (see previous adverts in this sequence for description) stand on top of it. A glass tankard of beer and an ashtray are on the bar. The camera zooms in to the two tankards, the smaller one has lipstick stains around its 'mouth', and the larger one leanas around to have a look at them. Close-up on the small tankard who accuses the larger one of being jealous and laughs, his lid moving up and down to produce this effect. Then a shot of both jugs, they turn in unison and the larger asks the barman to fill them up with 'Utica Club'. Cut to man's arms, with rolled-up shirt sleeves, opening a bottle of beer. He then pours the beer into the small tankard, whose lid then closes when it's full. He says 'this beer feels like champagne today', and the large tankard espouses the beer's 'natural bubbles', their big selling point being the 'naturalness' of their beermaking process. Close-up of the lipstick-stained tankard as he says that the other tankard has never been picked up by a lady. Then the two break into a song about Utica beer 'with no artificial bubbles', and how Utica 'age beer the natural way'. Closeup of a bottle of Utica Club standing on the bar, with empty drinks glasses in the background, followed by close-up of the label on the bottle, clearly showing the product name.
Ends.

Inside the battlements of a castle, a troop of footsoldiers march across a sandy courtyard. Titles on screen read: 'Beau Chex, starring Lee Goodman'. A man, presumably Lee Goodman, sits at a wooden table with a candle burning in a holder, he wears a French foreign legion-style soldiers uniform with a peaked hat and clutches a box of 'Corn Chex' tightly to his chest. The camera pulls back and a door opens and a soldier enters, saluting, and announcing to the 'commandant' that reinforcements have arrived, he exits through the open door. Back to shot of soldiers on horseback trotting across the courtyard as a bugle sounds. Back inside the soldier wheels a trolley over to the 'commandant', the trolley is full of boxes of Corn Chex cereal, the commandant says 'At last, a new supply of Corn Chex breakfast cereal' as they salute each other. Suddenly the commandant grabs a handful of cornflakes and throws them into the air, accusing the soldier of being a 'fool' and saying that cornflakes are 'absolutely obsolete' - shot of soldier looking worried as he repeats 'absolute' then the commandant who adds 'obsolete'. He grabs a box of 'Corn Chex' and begins to pour them into a small glass bowl, describing their qualities as he does so. Close up of cereal being poured in to the glass bowl - they look like 'Shreddies', followed by milk, then a spoonful of white sugar. Back to the commandant sitting at the table, watched by the soldier as he tucks into his bowl of cereal. The soldier implores 'What am I to do?' and the commandant jumps up, his fringed epaulettes shaking, and grabs his sword, exclaiming 'I'll do it myself', as the soldier drops to his knees, his hands pressed together as though praying. The commandant leaves the hut, wheeling a supermarket shopping trolley. Interior scenes are quite dark.
Ends.

Two hand puppets standing on a ledge, one is dressed in a white doctor's coat, the other in a checked waistcoat. The latter carries a small sign which reads 'a dramatization'. He asks what the solution is to a 'lonesome feeling in your stomach'. The doctor replies 'breakfast', and asks the puppet to hold up a sign which says 'breakfast'. The puppet complains that he is too busy for breakfast, and the doctor patronisingly tells 'Waldo' to put the sign down which he does. The doctor recommends an 'instant breakfast' and a table set for breakfast is the next scene - again the blurred checkerboard pattern in the background, and a packet of 'Instant Ralston whole wheat cereal' with the checked pattern on the packet, a steaming bowl of cereal, a glass of orange juice and a cup of black coffee, the 'doctor' describes the breakfast in voiceover. An animated sequence shows a man with a simple depiction of his internal organs - a hovering bowl of steaming cereal approaches. The man looks unhappily at it, then the familiar checkerboard pattern appears on the side of the bowl (to show that it now contains Ralston cereal) and the bowl tips its contents into the man's open mouth, the cereal, appearing as lots of Rs, flows down his throat and into his stomach. When the bowl is finished, the man turns to face us and smiles, and his teeth turn into the black and white checkerboard pattern. Animation ends - back to the two puppets, who break into a song about Ralston cereal from 'Checkerboard Square'. Back to shot of the table this time with just the bowl of cereal and the box.
Ends.

Man sits at a typewriter in a room, wearing a peaked eye-shade, a large ceiling-fan rotates above him, his jacket is hanging on a coatstand, and there is an old-fashioned upright telephone on his desk. He takes off the eye-shade and speaks to camera. Cut to a white timber-framed house on a hilly suburban street full of similar style houses. The camera zooms in to the window of one of the houses and inside a bedroom we see a man dressed in a striped nightshirt lying asleep in his single bed - there follows a sequence of still shots of the man, as a narrator describes the action taking place. In the next still the mans eyes are open, then he is sitting up in bed, looking very alert, (he has a very expressive, comical-looking face) with his head turned to the side, looking away from the camera. Next still is a woman wearing a frilly night cap who is raising her head a couple of inches from the pillow looking sleepily at the camera. Shot of the man, still in his nightshirt, raising his index finger as though he has an idea, in the next still he presses the finger to his temple. There is a loud-patterned wallpaper on the wall behind him. The narrator describes his idea - a new tasty peanut butter that is easy to spread all the way to the bottom of the jar.
Next a short film sequence - a 'surreal' dream sequence showing the man lying in what looks like a bed, dreaming about a jar of peanut butter which is also seen, it tips up and a knife scrapes out some smooth peanut butter, the man floats off the 'bed', which is actually a slice of white bread, and the knife spreads its load onto the bread.
Back to stills shots - the man in a striped nightdress leans against an invisible wall, looking very pleased with himself, then enormous peanuts start appearing and the man tries to shield himself from them by raising his arms to protect himself. More peanuts keep appearing until his face and arms are just visible in the centre. Back to a still of the man with loud wallpaper behind him, raising his hand with a look of determination on his face, as a jar bearing a label which says 'Schmick & Fram' appears in his hand. Next scene - simple animation of photo image of man, now dressed in a raincoat and black bowler hat, pushing the (just visible) handle of a shopping cart through a grocery shop represented by drawings of a bunch of bananas, a set of hanging scales, and photo-image of a pile of oranges. As he moves along he passes a free-standing display of jars of Skippy peanut butter, and pauses to look quizzically at it, as the narrator explains his shock at realising that 'Skippy' brand peanut butter already exists, so there is no need for his version. The camera closes up on one of the jars - the label reads 'Skippy - creamy peanut butter'. The man (in stills shots) takes a jar, then it is open and he is looking at the contents, eyes wide. Next he looks at the camera, then with a resigned look about the mouth which drops on one side, disppointed.
Back to the first man (normal film) who holds a jar of 'Skippy' in front of a plain black background while the caption appears: 'If you like peanuts, you'll like Skippy'
Ends.

Cheerful music plays as an elephant is led along outside - camera pans to a gaily-painted caravan which has a clown leaning out of a small window, holding a small white fluffy dog in his arms. The words 'Duke the Clown' are just visible on the side. The clown has a undersized hat on his head, and takes off his stick-on moustache as he turns back inside the caravan. Shot inside the caravan, the clown wears a white shirt and trousers with braces, he still carries the small white dog in his arms. The interior of the caravan has shelves with juggling clubs and ball-game raquets. A selection of hats hang above the small curtained window. The clown carries the dog towards a table and places his onto it, turns and picks up a plate which he flicks up in to the air, catching it as it spins and placing it onto a tray on another table. The clown 'narrates' the sequence as a voiceover throughout. He picks up a glass bottle of milk from a shelf, a bowl and a sugar-shaker, and proceeds to juggle these three items. A sign that says 'Duke the clown' is hanging in the background. The juggled items land on the tray with the plate on it. The clown picks up the tray, and bows to the dog, who is watching the display, the clown tips the tray in the process, but the crockery and milk remain stuck to the surface. He picks up a pile of 'Wheat Chex' and they turn into a tower, he then tips this tower, which stays stuck together, and the cereal pours out of the top box and into his cereal bowl. There's a close-up of the cereal being poured in to the bowl, followed by the milk being poured in. The clown eats the cereal, chewing contemplatively as the voiceover says 'Real grown-up flavour'. He is then shown sitting at his dressing table mirror, which is illuminated by light-bulbs around the frame, he applies white make-up to his face. A box of 'Wheat Chex' sits on the dressing table beside him, his dog, wearing a spikey headdress, sits on the other side. Next scene, a man in a suit with a white shirt and tie stands in front of a table. The little white dog walks into shot on the table, dragging a small cart behind him with a box of 'Wheat Chex' inside, and the man picks up the box of cereal, there follows a close-up of the box so that the brand name is clearly visible, and the distinctive checkerboard pattern. Next shot -back to the man in the suit, holding the cereal box, and the dog who sits patiently on the surface, still attached to the little cart - he says 'Get Wheat Chex, the grown up cereal from Checkerboard Square' as the dog glances at him.
Ends.

Outdoors shot of a toy boat floating in water. Next scene, a teenage boy and girl are in a small motor boat, the boy steers the craft as they move slowly away from a small wooden jetty. They are neatly dressed in white shirts and sweaters, and shorts - the girl has dark shoulder length hair cut in a bob, the boy has short dark hair. The boat passes by the camera and out of shot, it has a small outboard motor and a flag waving from the stern. The voiceover warns of the dangers of boating without experience or equipment, and lists the items one should always take on a boat trip as they appear, lined up on a wooden surface. A can of fuel, a paddle, fire extinguishers, anchorand a rope can be seen. Back to the youngsters on the boat - the girl passes the boy a life jacket as the narrator adds to the list: first aid kit and life preservers. The boy stows his life-preserver by his seat. Next shot is the boat moving slowly between two rows of large wooden stakes with white-painted tops in the water, then there's a close-up of the two as the boat bobs on the water, as the narrator reminds us not to forget 'knowledge and skill' in addition to safety equipment. The boat motors out into open water, steered by the boy, creating a wide behind them as they move into the distance, remaining in shot. Next shot is a close-up of a cloth badge which has a steering wheel (the old-fashioned wooden ship's wheel type) with a cross in the centre and the words 'Small Craft Safety' written between the spokes. The advert is to encourage boat users to enrol for Small Craft Safety courses.
Ends.

Caption on plain black screen - 'This week in TV guide' - music plays with a voiceover describing what's in 'TV Guide' followed by a shot of the magazine with a photographic image of Lucille Ball posing on some stone steps with a group of trendy-looking (mid-sixties fashions - women in mini skirts, men wearing waistcoats) young people all striking various poses like a modern dance troupe.
Ends.

Caption on black screen - 'Big Three Golf', followed by 'Rockwell Power Tools' with a drawing of a drill underneath, then the Lincoln Mercury insignia which a jaguar's? head with the mouth open in a snarl on a shield-shaped background.
Ends.

Open sea with a trained dolphin swimming 'upright' in the water - caption in white letters over image reads: 'The National Safe Boating Week Committee presents', while a voiceover tries to imitate the squeaks of a dolphin as though the dolphin is narrating the sequence. The dolphins swims upright and backwards through the sea. Next scene is an huge marina with many small motor cruisers and yachts all moored together many with covers over them to protect them from the elements. Moving shot taken from a car driving along a jetty with small trees in the foreground. Shot of a large cruiser on the water, group of small yachts with coastline in the background, a yacht in full sail, followed by a tiny yacht being sailed by a small boy of about ten wearing a white cap. Next shot is a group of yachts, a small cruiser and a large white clipper ship in full sail. Then, to demonstrate careless boating a man stands up in his tiny rowing boat, looks like he's holding a flare? And promptly falls into the water with a splash. Dolphin appears, shaking his head, and saying 'oh no' in a squeaky dolphin voice and tutting, as we see a close-up of a sailors white peaked cap floating in the water. Again the dolphin shakes his head and tuts as a larger sea mammal - pilot whale? Comes up out of the water with a sailor's cap on his snout. Then the sailor bobs up with the hat perched on his head and squirts out a mouthful of water. Again, a shot of 'Flipper' the dolphin, who is 'laughing', followed by the 'whale' with the cap on, he says the whale and the sailor both look alike (with their identical caps) but only 'Bubbles' the whale has any sense - shot of the man waving his arms as he flails in the water. The narrator warns never to go out without a life preserver and never to stand up in a small boat. Drawn image of a dolphin, carrying a white life-saving ring with the words 'practice safe boating' written on it, and the caption: 'A public service sponsored by Long Beach Marina, Long Beach, Calif. Photographed at Marineland of the Pacific'.
Ends.


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